Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ

Monthly Archives: December 2009

Why Buying and Holding Isn’t what it used to be…

By: Sean Carpenter

Are you finding deals are getting tougher to close with the new restrictions banks are pushing on applicants?

Is it taking longer to get a deal done? Have you stopped looking for new projects to acquire?

The last year has been a very difficult period in real estate history. Some markets have declined upwards of 50% in value with no light at the end of the tunnel. Not very good news if you started your “buy and hold” in 2007, but will certainly work better for you now in 2009 as you pick properties up for a fraction of their price two years ago.

Not to mention cap rates are heading into the two digits in larger metropolitan areas. For some, this is an area of the market they have never experienced.

So what can we do to get some of these declining assets?

The banks that were lending up to 125% a few years back have either left the market or cap an acquisition at 70% loan to value. The remaining 30% is up to the investor. But raising the 30% slows down transactions and your friends in Congress have attempted to help.

In July 2008, the President signed the Housing & Economic Recovery Act (HERA), which among other things, provided $4.5B to all 50 states, some territories like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia, to combat neighborhood declination by foreclosure.

These funds, known as the Neighborhood Stabilization program, were supposed to help investors, both for and non-profits, buy and rehabilitate foreclosed buildings in order to prevent the stable households from losing too much value. In February 2009, Congress added an additional $4.5B to the program, now known as NSP II, to further carry out the NSP mission.

This is nothing new. The federal government has been investing in real estate for years, at least since HUD was conceived during the Johnson administration in 1965 as part of the Great Society initiative.

HUD allocates through the individual States and territories upwards of $20B per year to facilitate economic development and housing activities. Additionally, many states have programs of their own that can match federal funds in addition to over $5B in tax credit programs available to stimulate acquisition, rehabilitation and new construction of real estate projects.

Buying and holding certainly isn’t what it used to be, but now the government wants to help you out more than ever. You just have to know WHERE to find the money and HOW to get the funds.

Sean Carpenter is the nation’s leading expert on Government Deal Funding for Real Estate Investors and Developers and has spent the last 12 years both consulting and getting funding for his own deals. I’ll be hosting a special interview with Sean coming up on Thursday, Jan 7th, 9:00 PM EST. Find out more and pre-register for the call by visiting: Get Public Funding

Use Real Estate Comps to Valuate Property in Fluctuating Markets

Home values are continuing to slide in much of the country, as a result of the declining real-estate market and credit crunch. Yet research indicates most people still think their property is worth more than it is.

How then, can you get a realistic idea of your property’s value to prepare to sell quickly and for the best profit? Using real estate comps of course.

First, recognize that the median value of existing homes nationwide dropped 4.6 percent nationwide between January 2008 and January 2009. That’s according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR). One major reason for this decline is a slowdown in sales in high-cost markets.

On the other hand, year-over-year median prices rose in roughly half of U.S.metro areas, NAR said. The group’s chief economist, Lawrence Yun, speculated that some markets where home values had been weakening are turning the corner.

Always check with InvestorCompsOnline.com to review resent sales activity in your area before listing or advertising your properties for sale. Researching prior to purchasing is always the best bet, but after you have purchased your property, you should run a report again to ensure that the property is priced right and in line with any changes your neighborhood may have undergone since purchase date.

Searching real estate listings and visiting open houses in your neighborhood can also help you get a feel for your local real estate market. Pay attention to what happens to those listings. Homes that stay on the market more than a few weeks might be priced too high.

Remember, InvestorCompsOnline.com recommends comparing your property to current sales of similar age, square footage, and room count. The key word here is “current.” If nothing else, recent housing market fluctuations have shown that property can be worth one amount one day and something else the next.

All the best,
MJ

What Will 2010 Bring For Investors?

by Mark Jackson [MJ in my PJ’s]

In order for Investors to fully understand the outlook of 2010 real estate market, InvestorCompsOnline feels it is necessary to understand issues relating to the lead up to the real estate market downturn. How these issues have affected the market will assist in understanding the coming year’s ideal investment opportunities. So, we have done that research for you and come up with ideas of what the coming year will bring.

Following the past 2 years of decline, a full market recovery is highly unlikely during 2010. The strongest developments towards recovery will be experienced in markets where controls existed for avoiding excessive lending, speculative buying and instability. Regions that have been hardest hit during the downfall of the real estate market have taken strong steps to avoid continued excessive decline. Control strategies will begin to show their results throughout 2010, with the hardest hit markets beginning to stabilize, while growth patterns emerge in the markets least affected by the downturn.

Our Investors should consider for the upcoming year to evolve from excessive speculative buying into strategies with improved stability and market demand. Long term investments are expected to be the strongest growth areas, with fewer risks involved and excellent gains potential due to the exceptionally low priced investment options available with REO investing.

At InvestorCompsOnline, we are constantly researching and evaluating the market and its changes to keep our members informed and advised. Our research has indicated that 2010 will continue to be an optimum buyer’s market, where those in a position to purchase will continue to receive and negotiate optimum deals. Equity enabled investors or investors that are using some of our creative suggestions for financing, are facing the ideal market conditions to access the best deals expected to be available for many years. Even if you are investing for long term benefits, you may also be in positions to once again benefit from a future turnaround into ‘seller’s market’ conditions.

Whatever 2010 may bring, InvestorCompsOnline is committed to providing you with the data and the training necessary to help you position yourself accurately to take advantage of all the opportunities of today’s real estate market.

All the best,
MJ